Monroe County, Indiana
Solid Waste Management District

The Hazardous Materials facility is your place for recycling, reuse, and proper disposal of your hazardous materials. Electronics, Freon appliances, household materials including pharmaceuticals, medical aids, paints, cleaners, and other common substances are hazardous waste that can pollute our soil, water, and air.

Below you'll find a list of hazardous materials options. They are broken down into several sections. Click the individual names below to go directly to that section, or scroll through the entire list.

Hours & Location

 

Hours

Tuesday through Saturday
7:30am-5:30pm

Click here for larger map and directions.

Hazardous Materials

 

Below you'll find a list of hazardous materials options. They are broken down into several sections. Click the individual names below to go directly to that section, or scroll through the entire list.

Automotive & Petroleum Products Disposal

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For more information, please call 812.349.2848 or click here to send an email.

Used motor oil, oil filters & antifreeze are accepted at all locations, all other auto fluids will only be accepted at the South Walnut Recycling Center.

Used Motor Oil, Antifreeze and Oil Filter

Pour them into their designated tank or drum. The containers you store oil or antifreeze in cannot be recycled. They are normal household trash.
A variety of toxic products are associated with the operation of cars, trucks, motorcycles, snowmobiles, lawn mowers, chain saws, and other equipment using petroleum products. Motor oil, antifreeze, transmission fluid, brake fluid, lead acid batteries, gasoline and other fuels may be highly flammable as well as toxic. Extreme caution should be taken when handling these materials. They may be a hazard to health and the environment if disposed of improperly.

NEVER DISPOSE OF ANY OF THESE PRODUCTS BY POURING THEM ON THE GROUND OR DOWN THE DRAIN OR THROWING THEM IN THE TRASH.

Used motor oil pollutes our water. Nearly every household in the United States generates used motor oil. Automobiles and light trucks produce over 600 million gallons of used oil annually. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, over 200 million gallons of this oil is tossed into the trash, spilled onto the ground or poured down drains and sewers each year. The catastrophic EXXON Valdez spill was small compared to the amount of oil dumped into backyards, ditches, and farm fields by Do-It-Yourself (DIY) oil changers.

During use, motor oil comes in contact with bearings, seals and other engine parts which add heavy metals and other contaminants considered hazardous to humans. So improper disposal creates a real threat to human health. Used oil dumped onto the ground reduces soil productivity, contaminates groundwater, and can poison fish and other wildlife.

Just one gallon of used motor oil can ruin a million gallons of fresh water—an entire year's supply of drinking water for 50 people!

Used Motor Oil

Used motor oil is an especially common waste product. Improperly discarded oil is a significant pollution problem across the United States. The oil drained from your car can be reprocessed and reused, thus conserving pertroleum resources and preventing contamination of the environment. Used motor oil should be put in a sealed container, such as a milk jug with a cap, and taken to an oil recycling center.

NEVER DUMP GASOLINE, HERBICIDES, PESTICIDES, PAINTS, SOLVENTS, OR OTHER NON-PETROLEUM PRODUCTS IN OIL THAT IS TO BE RECYCLED. Once added, they may permanently contaminate the oil, making it unrecyclable.

Transmission and Brake Fluid

Transmission fluid is similar to motor oil and can be added to oil recycling.

Re-refined oil decreases our dependency on foreign oil.

Recycling used motor oil decreases our dependency on natural resources and conserves energy. Three times more energy is used to process crude oil than to re-refine used oil. By recycling, the U.S. can save thousands of barrels of oil per day. It takes just one gallon of used oil, compared with 42 gallons of crude oil, to produce the same 2.5 quarts of lubricating oil. As for quality, today's re-refined oil products meet or exceed the same stringent performance standards that apply to virgin oil products.

Recycling oil filters saves resources & energy

Americans change over 400 million oil filters a year! These filters contain a high steel content and additional motor oil, both easily recycled. If all of the oil filters manufactured in 1994 had been recycled, an estimated 161,500 tons of steel could have been recovered and 17.8 million gallons of used oil would have been kept out of our fields and waterways.

Unfortunately, most used oil filters are not recycled, so the oil they contain is released into the environment. Currently, 90% of do-it-yourselfers throw their filters in the trash, sending about 10 million gallons of used oil to landfills every year.

Antifreeze

Antifreeze contains the chemical ethylene glycol, which poses a potential health hazard to humans and animals. Its sweet taste and smell make it attractive to children and pets.

NEVER POUR OLD ANTIFREEZE IN A POP BOTTLE OR LET IT FORM A PUDDLE IN THE DRIVEWAY.

Antifreeze can pollute ground, surface, and drinking water supplies if poured into storm sewers or dumped on the ground. Some service stations now recycle used antifreeze. Antifreeze is accepted at all District locations, or check with local gas stations or radiator repair shops for an antifreeze recycler near you.

If you cannot find anyone to recycle your antifreeze, you may be able to dispose of a SMALL—up to a quart—quantity of antifreeze by pouring it down the drain with lots of water. But, if you are on a city sewer service, you should call your waster water treatment plant to be sure the system can handle antifreeze.

WARNING: If you have a septic system, be aware that antifreeze can overwhelm the organisms in the system. No more than a quart at a time, mixed with generous quantities of water, should be disposed of in one week. This means if you have four quarts, you would dispose of it over a period of four weeks.

Recovering antifreeze is easy & economical

U.S. cars generate over 60 million gallons of used antifreeze each year. Most antifreeze contains the poisonous chemical ethylene glycol. Like motor oil, used antifreeze also collects hazardous contaminants from the engine during use. Antifreeze has a sweet taste which attracts children and pets. It may cause injury or death through ingestion, inhalation or skin absorption. In the past, disposal of used ethylene glycol has included treating it as a hazardous waste, discharging it into municipal sewer systems, or illegally pouring it into dry wells and storm drains. These methods of disposal are no longer necessary because now antifreeze can be recycled easily and inexpensively.

Automotive Batteries

• Wet Cell
• Used car batteries
• Sealed lead acid batteries
 

Automotive batteries pose a hazard because of the toxicity and corrosiveness of the acid and metals in them. Marine, tractor, lawn mower, motorcycle, and other vehicle and equipment batteries should be taken to the Hazardous Material Facility.

Battery Disposal Collection Sites

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For more information, please call 812.349.2848 or click here to send an email.

Black's Lumber

1710 South Henderson St., Bloomington
812.332.7208

Bloomingfoods East

3220 East 3rd Street, Bloomington
812.336.5400

Bloomingfoods Kirkwood/Downtown

419 East Kirkwood Ave., Bloomington
812.336.5300

Bloomington City Hall

401 North Morton, Bloomington
812.339.2261

Bloomington Hardware

South College Mall Road, Bloomington
812.339.7575

Bloomington Police Department

East 3rd Street, Bloomington
812.339.4477

City of Bloomington Utilities

600 E. Miller Drive, Bloomington
812.349.3677

Cord Camera

223 South Pete Ellis Drive, Bloomington
812.334.2343

CVS East

510 South College Mall Rd., Bloomington
812.336.0270

CVS West

3477 West 3rd Street, Bloomington

Dillman Road RSWS

400 West Dillman Road, Bloomington
 

ECS

2476 North Industrial Drive, Bloomington
812.336.4411

Ellettsville RSWS

6200 North Matthews Drive, Ellettsville
 

Hazardous Materials Facility

3400 South Walnut Street, Bloomington
812.349.2848

Interstate Batteries

1117 North Jackson, Bloomington
812.334.2102

Kirkwood Photo Lab

3376 West 3rd Street, Bloomington
812.332.4888

Kroger East

Jackson Creek Plaza-East, Bloomington
812.333.5766

Meadowood Retirement Community

2455 Tamarack Trail, Bloomington
812.336.7060

Oard Road RSWS

341 N. Oard Road, Bloomington
 

Photo Solutions

115 North Madison, Bloomington
812.333.1212

Quick Pic Inc.

927 South College Mall Rd., Bloomington
812.334.1567

Radio Shack East

College Mall, Bloomington
812.336.2588

Radio Shack West

Whitehall Plaza, Bloomington
812.334.1442

True Value Hardware

4610 West Richland Plaza, Ellettsville
812.876.2632

New Unionville RSWS

6015 E. State Road 45 (enter on Bethel LN), New Unionville
 

Freon Appliance Disposal

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For more information, please call 812.349.2848 or click here to send an email.

ACCEPTED AT THE SOUTH WALNUT RECYCLING CENTER ONLY

Freon appliance recycling is available for items such as refrigerators, freezers, air conditioners, and dehumidifiers. Bring your appliance to the Hazardous Materials facility at 3400 South Walnut Street.

The appliances are then picked up by a company who safely recovers the Freon and recycles the unit. When Freon containing appliances are disposed of properly, it keeps our environment healthy by keeping chemical contaminants out of our air, soil, and water.

A standard fee of Twenty Dollars ($20.00), per unit, shall be charged for the collection and handling of appliances containing chloro-flouro-carbons (CFC) (refrigerant), including but not restricted to air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators.

A standard fee of Fifty Dollars ($50.00), per unit, shall be charged for the collection and handling of larger items containing chloro-flouro-carbons (CFC) (refrigerant), including but not restricted to commercial coolers, cola machines, and medical equipment. Click here for more information.

Gasoline Disposal

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For more information, please call 812.349.2848 or click here to send an email.

ACCEPTED AT THE SOUTH WALNUT RECYCLING CENTER ONLY

Gasoline is one of the most dangerous substances found around the home. It is both highly flammable and extremely toxic. Improper disposal and storage of gasoline not only presents a health and safety hazard but also threatens the quality of the environment.

NEVER DISPOSE OF GASOLINE BY POURING IT ON THE GROUND, DOWN THE DRAIN, OR THROWING IT IN THE TRASH.
NEVER MIX GASOLINE WITH OTHER PRODUCTS.

HOW DOES GASOLINE BECOME A WASTE?

Any time gasoline is not used for its intended purpose, it becomes a hazardous waste. Usually this happens when gasoline has been stored for a very long period of time or has been contaminated with rust, dirt, or water.

WHAT HAPPENS TO GASOLINE WHEN IT IS STORED?

As gasoline ages, some of its components evaporate, leaving behind a thickened material like a lacquer or varnish, which may be difficult for an engine to burn. To avoid this problem, store gasoline in an air-tight container. This will prolong the life of the gasoline.

HOW DO I USE OLD GASOLINE?

To dilute old gasoline, simply mix it with at least three times as much fresh gas. For example, one quart of old gasoline should be mixed with three quarts of fresh. Generally, the more the old gas is diluted, the better the engine will run. This may be done right in the gas tank if it is large enough to hold the necessary quantities. Otherwise, combine the gas in an approved gasoline container.

Work outside away from flames or heat. DO NOT SMOKE. If you wish to use the old gas in your car, put approximately one gallon of old gasoline in each time you fill the tank until it is gone.

If you have usable gasoline that you do not wish to use, give it to someone who will. Some large trucks, buses, and farm machinery can burn old fuel.

WHAT IF I HAVE 2-CYCLE GASOLINE?

Since 2-cycle gas is actually a mixture of gasoline and oil, it can only be used in engines that specifically call for this kind of a mix.

As with plain gasoline, old 2-cycle gas can be diluted and used, but dilution must be done with more 2-cycle gas to keep the relative proportions of gas and oil the same. Do not dilute 2-cycle gas with straight gasoline or use it in engines for which it is not intended.

WHAT IF MY GASOLINE IS CONTAMINATED?

Dirt, rust, or other solids can be removed from gasoline by filtering it through two layers of thin cloth or a coffee filter. Work outside away from flames and heat and DO NOT SMOKE. The cloth or paper filters can be allowed to dry in a well-ventilated area away from children or pets and disposed of in your regular trash.

GAS AND WATER DO NOT MIX.

Water in a gas can sinks to the bottom. Gasoline that has been contaminated with small amounts of water can be restored by adding a fuel dryer. This is available at many hardware, auto parts, or lawn mower/equipment stores.

Gasoline with larger amounts of water can usually be salvaged by allowing the gas to sit undisturbed for one to two weeks until the water all settles to the bottom. Then carefully pour or siphon off as much gas as possible, leaving mostly water in the bottom of the original container. The remaining material should be handled as a Household Hazardous Waste.

Household Hazardous Materials Disposal

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For more information, please call 812.349.2848 or click here to send an email.

ACCEPTED AT THE SOUTH WALNUT RECYCLING CENTER ONLY

NOTE: Material generated from Monroe County households are free of charge except for latex paint.

You might be surprised to know that many of the familiar substances in your home are hazardous. The average household contains between 3 and 10 gallons of hazardous materials.

Cleaning Supplies

Do not discard old cleaning supplies by pouring them down the sink. We accept all types of cleaning supplies.
• Bathroom cleaner
• Bleach
• Ammonia

 

Car Care Products

Empty containers may be recycled.

Old Medications

Do not flush old medications down the toilet. Medications are incinerated. Confidentiality is assured. Click here for more info on pharmaceutical disposal.

Pesticides and Fertilizers

Do not throw away old pesticides and fertilizers.

Acids and Bases

Examples of acids and bases in the home are:
• Drain opening agents
• Old cleaning chemicals
• Toilet cleaners
• CLR
• Lime Away
• Oxidizers
• Pool Chemicals
• Hydrogen Peroxide






 

Propane Tanks

We accept propane tanks. They can be empty or full. Both 1 lb and 20 lb. tanks are accepted.

Flammable Liquids

• Gasoline
• Mineral Spirits
• Paint thinner
• Fuel Additives
• Brake Fluid


 

We cannot accept:

Radioactive substances. (Return these to the manufacturer)
Asbestos
Explosive substances including ammunition
Tires

 

Your household contains hazardous materials if you have any of the following:

In the kitchen...
• aerosol cans
• cleaners
• drain cleaners
• floor care products
• metal polish
• oven cleaners

In the bathroom...
• cleaners
• disinfectants
• hair relaxers
• medicines
• nail polish
• pharmaceuticals - click here for more info on pharmaceutical disposal
• polish removers





 

In the garden...
• fungicide
• herbicide
• insecticide
• rodent poisons
• weed killers
• pesticides




 

Here and there...
• batteries - click here for more info on household battery disposal
• furniture polish
• mothballs
• photographic fixer
• pool chemicals
• silver polish
• solvents

In the garage... click here for more info on disposal of automotive products
• antifreeze
• auto batteries
• brake fluid
• degreaser
• gasoline
• kerosene
• lighter fluid
• motor oil
• oil filters







 

Electronics are accepted every week at ALL Recycling Centers.

Items with a screen are only accepted at our South Walnut Recycling Center and are subject to a $20.00 fee.

Click here for location information.








 

 

We accept any item that requires an electrical cord or a battery to operate.

FREE Electronics Recycling includes: cell phone, telephone, microwave oven, fan, radio, curling iron, hair dryer, power tool, speaker, calculator, toaster, toaster oven, computer, computer mouse, keyboard, coffee maker, countertop appliances, among other electronic devices.

Please call 812.349.2848 for more information, or click here to send an email.







 

 

Household Battery Disposal

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For more information, please call 812.349.2848 or click here to send an email.

ACCEPTED AT ALL RECYCLING CENTERS

Click here for location information.

There are several types of household batteries currently on the market: alkaline, mercury, lithium, rechargeable nickel cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, lithium ion, and the new rechargeable alkaline battery. These batteries contain such metals as mercury, cadmium, lithium, and copper. All of these metals pose a potential threat to our health and environment if they are improperly disposed of by dumping or burning. Recycle household batteries!

WHAT BATTERIES CAN BE RECYCLED, AND WHAT HAPPENS TO THEM?

• Dry Cell
• All household batteries
• Alkaline
• Nickel-Cadmium
• Nickel-Metal Hydride
• Silver Oxide
• Mercury
• Lithium
• Lithium-Ion
• Lead Acid







 

All household batteries can be recycled! The metals in household batteries can be reclaimed and used in other products. See Automotive and Petroleum Products for auto battery information.

Alkaline batteries are the most common household battery and include AA, AAA, C, D, 9 volt, and lantern type batteries. In spite of recent reductions in mercury content, alkaline batteries still contribute a significant amount of mercury to the waste stream.

Button batteries are so-called because of their size and shape. They are used in watches, cameras, calculators, hearing aids, and electronic games. Mercuric oxide and silver oxide are their primary components.

Rechargeable batteries can be reused many times, but they do eventually wear out. These batteries can be recycled with your other household batteries. The new rechargeable alkaline battery has the advantage that it contains no added cadmium.

WHY RECYCLE BATTERIES?

Thirty-five percent of all background mercury comes from incinerating batteries with your household garbage.

Mercury and mercury compounds in batteries are highly toxic to people, wildlife, and the environment. Health risks associated with mercury include kidney damage and genetic, neurological, and psychological disorders. Cadmium is a confirmed human carcinogen and is poisonous when ingested or inhaled.

Collecting household batteries for recycling keeps the metals out of landfills, burn barrels, and incinerators. It reduces our exposure to these metals, and it reclaims a valuable resource.

WHAT CAN I DO?

• Use solar powered products whenever possible.
• Plug in an AC/DC adapter when you can.
• Use rechargeable batteries, especially the new alkaline rechargeables.
• Recycle all your household batteries at your local collection site.
• Pass the word about battery collection in the county.


 

DON'T BE PART OF THE PROBLEM - BE PART OF THE SOLUTION

BATTERY FACTS!

Each household in the U.S. discards an estimated 2 pounds of batteries annually - that's 2.5 million pounds of batteries entering the waste stream each year.

Household batteries account for over half of the cadmium and most of the mercury in our trash. The dumping and burning of household batteries is partially responsible for the contamination of fish, soil, air, and ground water in Indiana.

Mercury Disposal

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For more information, please call 812.349.2848 or click here to send an email.

ACCEPTED AT THE SOUTH WALNUT RECYCLING CENTER ONLY

Mercury in any form is accepted

• Thermometers
• Thermostats
• Fluorescent light bulbs
• High intensity discharge bulbs
• Elemental mercury
• Mercury containing compounds
• Debris
• Devices





 

Paint Exchange & Disposal

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For more information, please call 812.349.2848 or click here to send an email.

ACCEPTED AT THE SOUTH WALNUT RECYCLING CENTER ONLY

We accept all kinds of paints and stains.

Latex*
Dried, Frozen, Liquid


*Reusable latex paint can be donated for free.

Non-reusable latex paint is accepted for a fee.
Fees are as follows:
1 quart or smaller = $2.00
1 gallon or smaller = $5.00
5 gallon or smaller = $20.00



 

The following are accepted free of charge:

Oil Based
Paint related products
Lead based paint and paint chips are free of charge
Rags used while applying linseed oil, paint thinner, mineral spirits, etc.

 

The reusable paint we receive is placed in the Haz Bin room to be used by residents for small home projects. While you're at the facility, be sure to visit the Paint & Materials Exchange at the Central Station's Hazardous Materials Facility. When the public drops off hazardous materials, we check them and put the usable products in the HazBin. For example, on an average day, we take in anywhere from 25 - 100 gallons of paints. Sometimes good paint comes in unopened. You might also be able to pick up some household cleaning solvents, auto fluids, or lawn and garden chemicals, depending on availability.

Household paints and solvents contain chemicals that can endanger human health and the environment if disposed of improperly. Since household paints and solvents are considered household hazardous wastes, they should be purchased and handled in one or more of the following ways:

Purchase only the quantity of paint you will need to do a satisfactory paint job. The quantity of paint needed can be determined by calculating the square footage of the walls being painted less windows and door openings. The paint can label will generally provide information on the square footage for which that particular paint will cover. If unused paint is left after the job is completed, apply a second, third... coat until the paint container is completely empty. Once the paint can is empty and dry, dispose of the empty can in the garbage or recycle the steel paint can at a metal recycler listed in the yellow pages under Recyclers or Scrap Dealers.

Use all leftover paint on odd jobs such as closets, under-side of steps, fences, dog house, attic, etc. Once the paint can is empty and dry, dispose of the empty paint can in the garbage or recycle the steel paint can at a metal recycler listed in the yellow pages under Recycling or Scrap Dealers.

The best thing to do with usable paint is to use it up! If you can't use your leftover paint, give it to someone who can. Usable paint may also be donated to friends and neighbors, housing assistance organizations, local community projects, schools, churches, local shelters and theatre groups, community outreach groups, Recreation departments, Park departments, or other similar groups in your area. You can also bring it to the Hazardous Materials Facility's Haz Bin Room for reuse. You may be able to write a portion of this donation off on your income taxes.

Paint thinners, mineral spirits and turpentine can be reused by first letting the paint particles settle to the bottom of the container in which you cleaned the brushes. The container should have a top to keep the liquid from evaporating during the process. After several days, pour the clear liquid into a clean, closed container for reuse on future paint cleaning projects. You may filter the liquid through a coffee filter to keep any paint particles from passing through.

Step 1: Find an outside work area away from children, pets and rain. Locked screen porches and storage sheds work well. Some latex paint contains lead and mercury so it's important to dry paint outdoors in a safe sheltered place.

Step 2: Dry it. Choose one of the drying methods described later on this page. Paint will take between several days and several months to dry. It depends on the type and quantity that you have.

Step 3: Throw the dried paint and other materials in the trash. Your empty metal paint cans can be recycled. Leave the lids off the dry paint cans to show they are empty.

For small amounts: Brush latex paint in layers on newspaper or cardboard and let dry. For larger amounts: Pour think layers (less than one inch) of paint onto cardboard or plastic. Allow paint to dry one layer at a time. Thin layers will speed up the drying process.

Pharmaceutical Disposal

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For more information, please call 812.349.2848 or click here to send an email.

ACCEPTED AT THE SOUTH WALNUT RECYCLING CENTER ONLY

Old Medications:

Do not flush old medications down the toilet. Medications are incinerated. Confidentiality is assured.

Why pharmaceuticals should be disposed of:

Unused drugs and drugs that have expired are a common household health threat to children and animals. When flushed down the drain or burned, they can release toxic chemicals into the environment. Some of these chemicals can damage septic systems and sewage treatment plants. There is a concern that released antibiotics may produce bacterial strains that are resistant to the antibiotic. Other drugs can be scavenged from the trash and illegally sold within the community.

Which pharmaceuticals should be disposed of?

All expired pharmaceuticals.
All unsealed syrups or eye drops.
All pharmaceuticals that should have been kept cold but were not.
All bulk or loose tablets and capsules.
All unsealed tubes of creams, ointments, etc.
Properly contained medical sharps.



 

What does the Hazardous Materials Facility do with the pharmaceuticals?

The pharmaceuticals are disposed of in a very high temperature incinerator.

Sharps Disposal

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For more information, please call 812.349.2848 or click here to send an email.

ACCEPTED AT THE SOUTH WALNUT RECYCLING CENTER ONLY

The District now only accepts sharps in sharps containers.

These are objects that penetrate the body such as needles, scapels, lancets, syringes, broken capillary tubes and glass, knives, exposed dental wires, drills, and burs. Never overfill or force items into the container.

Universal Waste Disposal

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For more information, please call 812.349.2848 or click here to send an email.

ACCEPTED AT THE SOUTH WALNUT RECYCLING CENTER ONLY
The Hazardous Materials Facility manages Universal Wastes under the Indiana Universal Waste Rule (329 IAC 3.1-16, incorporating 40 CFR 273). This Rule does not potentially apply unless a waste is first characteristic or listed hazardous waste by definition under 40 CFR 261. The Rule presently further limits the realm of wastes defined as "universal wastes" to the following four specific but widely generated categories.

1. Universal Waste Batteries

This includes discarded primary (non-rechargeable) and secondary (rechargeable) batteries that contain elements such as cadmium, lead, or mercury, which would render them RCRA-hazardous. Examples are nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cad), sealed lead-acid, or mercury oxide batteries. Lead-acid batteries (such as automotive batteries) that are generated, transported, or collected to be reclaimed, or regenerated, but not reclaimed where stored, under provisions of 40 CFR 266, Subpart G, "Spent Lead-Acid Batteries Being Reclaimed," do not need to be managed as universal waste. However, waste lead-acid batteries not managed, or eligible for management, under 40 CFR 266, Subpart G, are subject to the Universal Waste Rule requirements. Lead-acid batteries that are stored at facilities that reclaim them are subject to RCRA regulation as specified in 40 CFR 266.80.

Many commonly generated waste batteries, such as dry cell zinc-carbon and alkaline ("long life") batteries, typically do not contain appreciable amounts of the hazardous elements of concern, and hence would not be required to be managed as universal waste. However, they may be managed along with universal waste batteries, and this is encouraged in the interest of diverting them from less desirable disposal destinies such as incineration or disposal in solid waste landfills.

2. Universal Waste Pesticides

Several classes of discarded pesticides that would otherwise be regulated as characteristic or listed hazardous waste may be eligible for management under the Universal Waste Rule: Stocks of unused suspended or cancelled pesticides that are subject to a voluntary or mandatory recall under the section 19(b) of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), or a voluntary recall by a registrant of a pesticide that is not in compliance with FIFRA; Stocks of other unused pesticide products that are collected and managed as part of a waste pesticide collection program.

Pesticides not subject to the prescribed recalls may have to be managed as hazardous waste when discarded. Farmers managing and disposing of such pesticides in accordance with the hazardous waste exclusion in 40 CFR 262.70, and complying with prescribed disposal instructions, are not subject to the Universal Waste Rule. Recall or unused pesticides are not considered waste until a decision to discard them has been made. However, they remain subject to the requirements of FIFRA. Questions concerning the requirements or applicability of FIFRA to pesticide management should be directed to the Office of the Indiana State Chemist located at Purdue University, phone AC 765.494.1492.

3. Universal Waste Mercury Thermostats

This category of universal waste is restricted to thermostats that contain mercury, or the mercury-containing ampoules removed from such thermostats. It does not include other mercury-containing items such as thermometers, switches, gauges, relays, etc. The Rule allows for the management of this waste either as intact thermostats or as removed mercury-containing ampules when specified measures to prevent environment release of mercury are followed.

4. Universal Waste Mercury-containing Lamps

This category has been added to those listed in the Federal Rule 40 CFR 273 by Indiana rule 329 IAC 3.1 - 16. Fluorescent light bulbs are the most common item in this category of universal waste, which includes any type of discarded electric lamp which contains mercury. This category does not include associated light fixture components such as ballasts. Mercury-containing lamps become subject to this rule if they are the hazardous waste under 40 CFR 261, and when they are permanently removed from a fixture or determined to be discarded.

Any materials resulting from the release, or clean up of spills or breakage, of any universal waste is not itself the universal waste. It must be determined whether or not such materials are a hazardous waste as identified in 40 CFR 261, and the material must then be managed and disposed of in accordance with applicable hazardous or solid waste regulations.

Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator

Eligibility

The Hazardous Materials Facility manages Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generators' (CESQG) Wastes and Universal Waste. A business must qualify as a CESQG to participate in the District's program. A CESQG can be a large industrial manufacturer or a small shop. CESQG status is achieved by producing less than 100 kgs. (220 lbs.) of hazardous waste per month, including a maximum of 1 kg. acutely hazardous waste. If a business generates more than this amount, it is required by law to use a licensed hazardous waste hauler to manifest and transport its waste.

Transporting and Labeling Waste

Caution should be taken when transporting hazardous material to the Facility. If possible, use the original product container, or label the container if the contents are different than listed. Do not mix materials! All containers should have secure lids and be packed upright in a leak proof box. Material Safety Data Sheets or any other information about the material (e.g. how it is used) should be provided.

Appointments

Business and all non-household entities (churches, schools, government agencies, and non-profit groups) need to make an appointment to drop off materials.

Business Price List

 

For more information, please call 812.349.2848 or click here to send an email.

CESQG, SWMD, ELECTRONICS & UNIVERSAL WASTE

PAINT & FLAMMABLES

1 Gal Paint Can $5.47/can
Quart Paint Can $2.07/can
5 Gal Paint Pail $32.57/pail
Paint Can Gaylord (Oil) $734.05/gaylord
Paint Can Gaylord (Latex) $404.05/gaylord
Paint Drum (55 gal) $254.70/drum
Aerosol Cans $2.59/lb
Flammable Liquids $3.47/gal





 

BATTERIES

Alkaline $0.75/lb
Lead-Acid $0.20/lb
Llithium $4.37/lb
Lithium Ion $0.20/lb
Ni/Cd $0.20/lb
Ni-Mh $0.20/lb
Button Batteries $4.05/lb




 

MERCURY

Fluorescent Tubes $0.10/ft
Broken Fluorescent Tubes $3.06/lb
U-tubes, Circline & Compacts $0.51/ea
UV Lamps $2.69/ea
Elemental Mercury $8.43/lb
Devices $6.08/lb
Debris $6.26/lb
HID Lamps $1.19/ea





 

OTHER MATERIAL

PCB Ballasts $2.08/lb
Non-PCB Ballasts $1.55/lb
Capacitors $4.71/lb
Syringes $2.40/lb
Fire Extinguishers $34.27/ea
Photographic Fixer $6.77/gal
1lb Propane Tanks $8.97/ea
20lb Propane Tanks $1.27/ea
Smoke Detectors $11.74/ea






 

LOOSEPACKS/PESTICIDES/PHARMACEUTICALS

Loosepacks $3.36/lb
Pesticides $3.36/lb
Pharmaceuticals $3.36/lb
 

Per MCSWMD resolution 2003-08, all CESQG and Universal Waste customers will be charged a $25 annual (Jan 1 - Dec. 31) membership fee to drop off materials at the Hazardous Materials Facility.

IRREGULAR OPERATIONS CHARGE: $76.20/person/hour

Please call 812-349-2848 to schedule a drop off appointment.

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